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on their census forms. even if they have their immigration status approved and they do not have to worry about immigration remains a priority. there is a sense of frustration. pass speaker will legislation's piecemeal. secure thefirst borders. that is what i hear a lot from our and stitch units. get immigration reform done. that is a priority -- that is what i hear a lot from our constituents. are very much tied together in my district. boom financially a few years ago. now construction is at an all- time low. tourism is still the driving force in south florida. will not be jobs coming back. we are getting a lot of jobs coming from venezuela and other places that are unstable. a sense of insecurity about the economy in south florida. those issues are what is driving the voters. that unites them is discussed at congress. i am glad to be that unifying force. 6% isot know what that that still approves of us. [laughter] >> immigration reform is something that we have worked on a lot in this congress. you have been one of the key players in the house. do you feel like your role as a woman or as a p
under obamacare. likewise on the immigration context of a case-by-case prosecutorial discretion is one thing but if they get policy that will apply to 1.8 million people, that is quite something different. this is a scale of decision-making that isn't in the traditional conception of the prosecutorial discretion. >> the president has taken it a step further and has actually given legal documents to the people in that circumstance well beyond simply deciding not to leave them there and not prosecute them but actually enable the violation by giving them documents to help them avoid the problems from the country that they are not present. >> [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] the chair now recognizes the ranking member. >> [inaudible] with the witness to his left and i would like to ask if he could pick up that line of discussion. we are pleased that you are here because there has been so much excitement or excited rhetoric about where president an the prd his administration are going. i've never heard of this level of hypothesizing where this is all going to take us and i think it is co
who said enforcement is therefore nonenforcement priorities of judge, immigration and other law. is it not related to the alleged violation of the constitution by the president sitting immigration enforcement priorities outlined earlier to. >> thank you congressman. the judge who was one of the most respected and conservative judges on the federal bench, but he said here is absolutely correct and the principles that he's enunciating are precisely why according to face with the issue is undoubtedly to uphold as perfectly compatible with the president's discretion and the program that my co- panelists here is a gross violation of his duty. it's an important decision about a year and a half ago, the five to three majority including justice kennedy who wrote the opinion behind the teacher of the removal system on the immigration area by the immigration officials. the initial matter he must decide whether it makes sense to pursue the removal out on the beat cobol and they went on to say that the president of the immigration law that forces the media concern and another as workers try
of the administration's decision to delay the employer mandate in health care law and various decisions on immigration and drug law. virginia republican bob goodlatte chairs the committee. we will have live coverage when they start. just a couple of news items on the industry should secretary of state, john kerry is in brussels. he's joining the diplomats around the world in hopes of persuading afghan manners to let troops remain in afghanistan beyond 2014, hamid karzai had signing the status of forces agreement. in washington, "the associated press" that the consumer finance watchdog is expanding its oversight of sallie mae and other companies. a rule issued today by the consumer financial protection bureau extends that agencies supervision to non-companies that have lenders. the cfp be overseas banks and service student loans, but most of the end from the white house, president obama will focus on the benefits of the health care law he will be flying by the white house says have benefited from the overhaul. he will remind american fork discrimination against those with preexisting conditions. we'll
actions taken by president obama, citing the changesth care law and to immigration rules. that hearing is next on c-span. then, house members pay tribute to the victims of the metro- that killedaccident four people in new york, sunday. that is followed by the u.s. capitol christmas tree lighting. >> from age eight, betty ford knew that she wanted to do something. she put on skits and plays and led to bennington, vermont at the schoolied of dance. these were some of her notecards. spiral notebooks where she kept notes. this is her organizer during this period. her toried this with , back to grand rapids, often new york where she studied workedrtha graham and for a modeling agency, and then back to grand rapids again. in it, you find a whole host of things that you would find in organizer.any brochures on dance costumes, one sketches of a costume for a dance routine and that she on.ed to put madeography notes that she for different dance routines. there is a whole wealth of here that talks about her love for dance and how it,ly she was involved in especially in her early years. >> what o
the president's actions do not enforce deportation against a certain classes of immigrants. you know, instead of complaining about that, this committee could hold a markup and report of a comprehensive immigration reform bill, send it to the for -- >> mr. lazarus, you are -- not you but the question is too inept minutes over. so you can do this by giving us advice of what our legislative agenda should lock like an answer the question, i would be grateful to you. >> that is an answer. i think on this has a lot of power and it should use it. >> and i assume that the failure to exercise is also an exercise of power. the failure to act. mr. cannon, would you like to briefly -- >> maybe mr. lazarus knows better than i do how many bombs the president has dropped before that becomes more. i don't know the actual number. but i think what mr. king was getting at is, there is one last thing to which the people can resort to the government does not respect the restraints the constitution places on the cover. abraham lincoln talks about our right to alter our government or our revolution right to overthr
immigrants. they stopped enforcement of drug laws, i know that because i'm a prosecutor and i saw it. he stopped the enforcement of mandatory sentencing and parts of obamacare. the benghazi issue. the irs issue. how many more things you think have to occur, thinking that a prosecutor, one of those is not enough evidence. two of those, in and of themselves, is not enough evidence. the violations that i see and have just listed, i think, is enough evidence to ask questions . where do you draw the lines and what i have recited as enough evidence to start asking questions about the president >> first ofs power? all, congressman, i cannot address all of the -- all of the -- the things that you have raised. many of those things, let's be honest about it, are honest disagreements about policy or how to interpret the law. but your interpretation of the law is -- you are saying that you do not agree with how i interpret the law and you say i am wrong. sentence,sh my raising the specter of some kind of grotesque residential authority,f unwanted it is not based on fact. mr. cantor believed that his
taken by president obama, citing the new health care law and changes to immigration rules. that hearing is next on c-span. then, house members pay tribute to the victims of the metro- north train accident that killed four people in new york, sunday. that is followed by the u.s. capitol christmas tree lighting. >> on the next "washington journal" representative jim mcdermott talks about the health care law. then house armed senate services representative duncan hunter talks about iranian nuclear program. and the recent launch a political magazine and the cover story of the relationship dream president obama's cabinet and his closest aides. also, your calls, e-mails, and tweets. >> next, the house judiciary committee examines president obama's use of executive powers. a panel of legal scholars testified of the white house decision to delay -- delayed the employer mandate in the health care law and about the enforcement of immigration rules. this hearing is over three hours. [gavel] >> the judiciary committee will come to order without objection. the chair candy could be says is that any t
-span. >> president obama's use of power related to the health care law. immigration policies and drug laws. coverage ofour live the hearing starting at 10:00 c-span 2.rn on are you walk in, there tables in front with lots of pamphlets, prior to entering the gun show. temperature pamphlet is how the take ment is trying to away the right to own guns, obama is doing that and obama is that and obama care is awful. talk to them. they said, who are you? i'm an academic, a researcher. research about these organizations and ideas. i study men who believe this stuff. and a bunch of them said -- they looked at me suspiciously and and i said, tions look here's what i am. don't get it. but here's my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your world view. you will not convince me. you.l not convince that's the table. i want to understand why you think the way you do. downward mobility, racial and gender equality. "angry white men," sunday night 9:00 on "after words" part of c-span 2. > vice president biden is in asia this week. his trip comes eight days after would required it all
a woman, i'm an immigrant, i'm hispanic. i don't qualify for aarp membership yet. and i am a republican. sadly, i'm an endangered species right now. and i often get asked how can you possibly be a republican? why are you a republican? the explanation lies in my personal history. my family's story is what shaped my political views. i came here in 1980. i was born in nicaragua. there was a communist revolution, the sandinistas came to power in 1979 after a three-year, bloody civil war. it turned out the sandinistas were also communists. by the way, i don't know if you know a sandinista got elected mayor in new york, and they quickly went about instituting communism in our little country. my parents were not fans of redistribution of wealth, and at that point they made the decision of getting out of nicaragua. my father stayed behind, he became a contra, a freedom fighter. and when your father's a guerrilla struggling to bring freedom back the your country, you realize at an early age that politics matter. election results matter. being a bystander is not an option. being involved is what
immigration reform, health care reform, and a budget. is there a timetable on those? is there a way to get those or is this an ongoing process? >> we talked about the button aggressions that are underway. when it comes to the effort to pass conference of immigration reform, the president believes the congress can act and should act as soon as possible. they can act right away, thousand could, when it comes to these issues. they are not gone yet. they ought to do something >> we talked about the button aggressions that are underway. when it comes to the effort to pass conference of immigration reform, the president believes the congress can act and should act as soon as possible. they can act right away, thousand could, when it comes to these issues. they are not gone yet. they ought to do something between now and their departure that could signal to the american people, in the case of the farm bill, that we have all of the necessary elements of that important legislation taken up -- taking care of on behalf of americans who depend on food and efficient assistance. and when it comes to con
engaged in the agenda. >> three things the president wanted to see, immigration reform, a farm bill, and a budget. about to leave. any sort of timetable on those. is there any way to get those. or is it an ongoing process. talked about budget negotiations that are under way. and when it comes to the farm effort the -- and the to pass comprehensive the ration reform, president believes the congress should act and can act as soon as possible and can act right away, the house could, when it comes to these issues. bill. farm >> it couldn't -- >> that's a shame if that's the case. they're not gone yet. they ought to do something etween now and their departure that could signal to the the casepeople that in of a farm bill that we have all the necessary elements of that important legislation taken care tural behalf of our agricul sector as well as on behalf of americans who depend on food and nutrition assistance. and when it comes to comprehensive immigration reform. conservatives have said in the past that there are many things about comprehensive immigration reform that conservatives
2014 budget. the farm bill. and immigration reform. reaching across the aisle has become more and more difficult and principled compromise seems like a mountain too tall to climb. this morning, i have the honor of introducing two national leaders who can hopefully help shed some light on how our legislative colleagues in washington, d.c. and the white house might be able to come together and find solutions to our nation's critical problems. let me begin with governor huntsman. he began his public service as a staff assistant to ronald reagan. he has since served four u.s. presidents in critical roles, including u.s. ambassador to singapore, deputy assistant secretary of commerce for asia, u.s. trade ambassador and most recently, u.s. ambassador to china. twice elected as utah's governor, he brought about strong economic reforms, tripled the state's rainy day fund, and helped bring unemployment rates to historic lows. in his tenure, utah was named the best state in america and the best state in which to do business. he serves as co-chair of no labels with u.s. senator joe masden. it's w
to pander. i don't have to ask for your favors here, curt. but if you look at what you did on immigration reform and on energy, just to mention a couple, and your election returns, you would have to say in a you're probably a textbook example of what happens when you get out the do the right thing. you're actually able to get things done in the end and have a legacy to look to. it's more than just rhetoric and textbook theory. some have put it in practice and you should be proud of what you've done and i know curt's put it in practice. i didn't mean to embarrass you but i wanted to put that out there as a real world example. >> we just have a couple minutes left. are there any members of the audience who would like to pose a question? we have senator ward from hawaii. gene, you're up. >> can we come visit? >> aloha. but hawaii is unique, obviously not only because of its terrain but because of its political history. we have super majority. i'm in the house of 51. my caucus is seven. in the senate there's one republican and 24 democrats. what are some insights i can bring back? i really li
because i don't have to ask for your favors any more. if you look at what you did on immigration reform and on energy just to mention a couple and your election returns you would have to say you are probably a textbook example of what happens when you get out and try to do the right thing. drawing from a broader coalition of supporters and able to get things done in the end and you have a legacy you can look to. it is more than just rhetoric and textbook theory. some of you have actually put it in practice. you should be proud of what you have done and i know that you have put it in practice, too. i didn't mean to embarrass you kurt. i wanted to point that out as a real world example of what we are talking about. >> just a couple of minutes left. any members of the audience that would like to pose a question? we have senator ward from hawaii. gene you're up. >> can we come visit? >> yeah, aloha! >> that is what -- hawaii is unique obviously not orange only because of its terrain but its political history consideration we have a super majority blue. i'm in the house of 51. my caucus is s
or smaller things? >> the first thing i would actually like to see in congress is comprehensive immigration reform. i mean, if you look at what the senate did, there is a path there that a lot of people compromised on to create a path to citizenship plus ways of making sure that we take people out of the shadows, we grow our economy, and we make sure our borders are secure. and so first and foremost, the house of representatives needs to focus on that. and i was part of the fast for families yesterday. i have been arrested on the whole process of trying to get to immigration reform and whatnot. in terms of education, this is an issue. pre-k is an issue about showing whether results actually really matter and what the research actually really matters or whether the congress lives in an evidence-free zone. we have seen pre-k actually works to help level the playing field. the president has put a bill out there. the house of representatives actually have a bipartisan bill, that aligns in the house of representatives and the senate, the miller-harkin bill, that has two republicans from new york
announcements today. >> the president said he wanted to see immigration reform, health care reform, and a budget. is there a timetable on those? is there a way to get those or is this an ongoing process? >> we talked about the button aggressions that are underway. the effort toto pass conference of immigration reform, the president believes the congress can act and should act as soon as possible. they can act right away, thousand could, when it comes to these issues. they are not gone yet. they ought to do something between now and their departure that could signal to the american people, in the case of have allbill, that we of the necessary elements of that important legislation taken up -- taking care of on behalf of americans who depend on food and efficient assistance. and when it comes to conference of immigration reform, as i've said in the past, and conservatives have said in the past, there are many things that conservatives could make a strong case for, including strong economic growth, including bringing people out of the shadows and making sure that they get to the back of the line in
, immigration. needless to say, for a period of time, this will obviously involve israeli participation. it has to. but there also have to be objective standards by which we measure performance. the former police commissioner in boston, ed davis, who is widely respected in the law- enforcement community, was in the west bank in august offering his strategic counsel. we will work with this as professionally as anybody has ever done. we will not leave things to chance. there is a serious responsibility that comes with statehood. and i have shared that notion with my friends in the west bank, and they take it seriously. they do. it will take time to train, build, equip, and test palestinian institutions to ensure that they are capable of protecting palestinian citizens. their primary responsibility is that. and also preventing their territory from being used for attacks on israel. now, i have heard all the arguments. we pulled out of lebanon. look what we got. we got rockets. we pulled out of gaza. look what we got. we got rockets. yeah, we did, but we also didn't settle any of the issues. unilate
bleeding over to immigration or into the iran talks to other policy areas it is looking to move ahead on in the next couple of months and years? guest: on immigration, the encouraging the congress to take up immigration, pass it, it just begins to sound like the same thing. when you have a weaker president, you are much less inclined to support what he is asking you to do. the white house position has oh is been the republicans have to see it as in their own best interest to make things right with a growing hispanic electorate, that they did very poorly the it -- poorly with in the last election. on iran, it is even more pressing. what the president is asking for now is six months to get a real agreement with iran to reduce its capacity to enrich iranian. center forw to the american progress where we have epa administrator gina mccarthy talking about climate change. ahead of her trip to china next week. u.s.-chinae that cooperation on the environment is critical to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, carbon pollution, for our country and the world. we are particularly excited to have h
of the ins if you chose to ignore pat on an immigration issue you do it on your own. the senator does a lot of things that are below the radar screen that make a big difference in the lives of other people who would otherwise fall through the cracks. he is not a show horse. he is a work horse. he has been a long time leader in the international campaign against landmi mines. he authored a bill to ban the export of these horrible weapons and spearheaded the effort to aid victims of land minds by creating a special fund and that fund has now on annual bases provide $12 million in aid to the vaccinaictims of these bomb. he sponsored the patrick leahy law and that prohibits the department of state and defense to provide military aid to foreign military and police forces that engage and violate human rights. and he never stops leading on an issue central to our mission at human rights first and that is refuge protection. and the act he sponsors elimina eliminates them from not having safe places to go. in 2009, he called for the creation of an independent investigation for torture after 9-11. he
fellow where he focuses on immigration policy and border control and security initiatives. as a board member we have been incredibly blessed with his expertise that have been invaluable to navigate complex political challenges. please join me to welcome jim ziegler. >> 84 that kind and generous introduction is a particular pleasure to introduce our keynote speaker. patrick leahy for -- patrick leahy from the great state of vermont. it is my pleasure because i consider him to be a good friend and for all of you out there it is possible for republicans or democrats to be friends in washington today. it is not easy but it is possible but a special honor because he is a real honest to goodness champion of the causes human rights for everyone everywhere. without reservation there is no greater champion of human rights of the u.s. congress and our friend patrick leahy. he is determined with his heroic work to the advance human rights is too extensive in detail to give him a chance to talk but with two or three of his large accomplishments but before i do that i want to mention i had an oppo
comprehensive immigration reform will. we are very disappointed on this side of the aisle that the senate bill has not been put on the floor. our bill or one of the four bills out of committee. it was supported by the republican party and the judiciary committee. they have not been brought to the floor. we believe immigration reform is a critically important action for the congress to take. we hope anyone of those options would be brought to the table. the senate has passed in a bipartisan way the end of discrimination in employment. we talk about jobs. we talk about economic opportunity. passed that bill. that is not on the agenda either. i noticed we do have an extension bill that has been specifically reference. we will get to a debate on that next week. we have a suspension bill we have been urging that is reported out of committee that passed by 350 votes. it simply says we ought to have a plan, and that will be to extend manufacturing, grow profits, gross salaries for individuals -- gross salaries -- grow salaries for individuals. and taxnt assistance extenders had been reference. hopefu
on an immigration issue, you do it at your own peril. i can tell you senator leahy does a lot of things that are below the radar screen that make a big difference in the lives of a lot of people who would otherwise fall through the cracks. he is not a show horse. he is a workhorse. pat leahy has been a longtime leader in the international campaign against land mines. in fact, in 1992, he offered the first bill of any government anywhere to be in the export of these very horrible weapons. in fact, he spearheaded the effort in congress to aid victims of landmines by creating a special fund known as the leahy war victims fund and that fund has now, an annual basis provides about $12 million of aid to victims of these horrible bombs. in 1897, senator leahy sponsored historic legislation appropriately known as the leahy law, which prohibits the u.s. department of state department of state and department of defense from providing military aid to foreign military and police forces and engage them byerly human rights. and he never stopped bleeding on an issue central to our mission at human rig
immigration sooner or later if you. -- if you want your economy to continue growing, and that immigration will probably come naturally from the whrat tin america, a political dividend here, and there's a tremendous opportunity for the u.s. in latin america. of course, china is always very interested in latin america's energy resources, in our water, in our biodiversity, and if they want to invest, latin america will welcome it. so be it. >> thank you. we are almost out of time, but before asking one last question, a couple housekeeping matters. we have our upcoming speakers. december 10, we have the honorable anna parker, mayor of houston, texas, dan acerson, chairman and ceo of general motors, and on december 19th, skaggs, bluegrass ledge. second, i want to present the guest with a press club coffee mug to be filled with colombia coffee. [laughter] >> thank you. >> thank you. [applause] and -- [applause] and for the time question, you mentioned the property pegs, 5 enthe u.s. team is looking for a change. how do you see the prospects in the world cup? >> well, i told president obama this
or monetary policy through the common central date to trade immigration and each division in the soviet republic would have their own police forces then we had to sell it with a peacekeeping force of 60,000 two-thirds of which would be supplied by one-third of the united states. you heard them talk about that. if i remember of the 60 percent of the people were opposed. i say that to make this point. the american people particularly when they think things about well at home. how political leaders often times popular not exactly like the voters still you not to do it it is like a blinking yellow light tell us what our objectives are intel is what it will cost. a and you better me right. if not you own a. that is basically what the polls made cannot make foreign policy decisions decisions, you just cannot do it. 80% of the people were against me helping mexico when we gave them a loan in 1995. in we had just lost congress. people thought i was nuts. thinking of bosnia we don't make the loan to mexico and they hate us and so does latin america and then the next year we have another 1 millio
the cooperation between the two areas and you are going to need immigration sooner or later if you want your economy to continue growing and that immigration will come naturally from latin america. that even has a political dividend here so there is a tremendous opportunity for the u.s. in latin america. of course china is very interested in latin america's energy resources, and our water, in our biodiversity and if they want to invest latin america will welcome it. >> thank you. we are almost out of time but for asking one more question couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all i would like to remind you of our upcoming speakers. on december 10 we have the honorable mayor of houston texas. on december 16th 16th dan nickerson chairman and ceo of general motors and on december 19, ricky skaggs grammy award-winning and bluegrass legend. second i would like to present our guest with the traditional national press club coffee mug full fleet to be filled with colombian coffee. [applause] and for the final question you mentioned the good prospects of colombia's national team. th
. the son of a russian immigrant happened to be seated by me at dinner this summer when hillary and i went to dinner with the bunch of our friends and he looked at me and said the you like boris yeltsin? yes, i did. he got a big smile, good. he said my country in its entire history has only produced two true democrats, alexander karen ski and boris yeltsin and listen got yeltsin to stay. too bad we lost it again but maybe we can get it back. an incredible conversation. russia was going broke. the first thing i did was go to vancouver and meet with boris yeltsin and put together a package to bring soldiers home from other countries. talking about this before the american people were 74% against the package, what is bill clinton going to do to meet with the russian leader? we got economic problems at home. i also knew i needed his cooperation to keep from gumming up the works in bosnia because of the historic ties of the russians to the serbs. so we did that. you heard all this before, but america was basically supposed to stop this awful violence in bosnia. miraculously acting on its own in
you is commissioner of the ins, if you choose to ignore pat leahy on its immigration issue, you do it at your peril. senator leahy does a lot of things that are below are screamed that make a good difference in the lives of a lot of people who would otherwise fall through the cracks. she is not a show horse. he is a workhorse. pat leahy has been a long-time leader in the international campaign against land mines. in fact, in 1992, he offered the first bill of any government anywhere to be on the export of these very horrible weapons. in fact come he spearheaded the effort in congress to aid the guns of landmine by creating a special fund known as the leahy were picked and signed. that fund has now on an annual basis provide about $12 million of aid to the victims of these horrible bombs. in 1997, senator leahy sponsored historic legislation appropriately known as the leahy law, which prohibits u.s. department of state and department of defense for military from police forces to engage. there's something essential to our mission at human rights first denies refugee protection. the c
's turning into a tory. can i test that theory? the immigration bill is being signed by 60 coalition mps calling for the transitional arrangements for bulgaria and romania to be continued. does he agree with that? >> mr. speaker, i'm glad he hasn't raised his morbid obsession with the earnings of the primus which i know is a subject of his private member's bill. and i want to thank in for his next double edge conflict just now. on the issue, as he knows the prime minister, myself, the whole government faces of announcements last week where we are tightening up the access to benefits for those that might come from the other parts of your opinion to this country. i believe we should protect and defend the principle of the freedom of movement but the freedom to move is not the same as the freedom to claim. that is a distinction which this government is now making. >> order. >> here on c-span2 we will leave the british house of commons not as a move onto other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's question time aired like wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern while parliament is
unified country with an undie vieded sir yea slow -- sarajevo as capital. trade and immigration, and each division -- the serbian republic and the bosnian and croatian republic -- would have their own police forces and, basically, run their domestic lives. then we had to sell it, including a peacekeeping force of 60,000, two-thirds of which would be supplied by 25 other countries, one-third by the united states. you heard them talk about that. as i remember, only about 60% of the people were opposed to us participating in that. i say that to make this point. the american people, particularly when they think not all is well at home, have their political leaders to act for them, but they know we have global responsibilities. often times when a proposed course of action is unpopular, it's not exactly like the voters are telling you not to do it, it's basically like a giant blinking yellow light. they're saying, for goodness sakes, be careful, tell us what our objectives are, tell us when it's going to be over, and tell us what it's going to cost. and you better be right. in other words, if y
of two immigrants who come from india. decades earlier. we lifed in a house in bedford, massachusetts a middle class family. when i was five, my parents got divorced and my dad left. my mother was on her own having never held a job before. she faced going back to india, or going on welfare to support her two young children. in india, we would have been marked stigmatized. it was unheard of to get divorced back then. she knew our life opportunities would be limited. she made that tough choice. she stayed. we stayed. we were on welfare. we were on food stamps. we received housing vouchers to help pay for rent. but because of a series of events we were able to remain in bedford and i was able to go to the public schools. my mom eventually got at the job at the travel agent, and by the time i was 11, i'm proud to say that she bought her own house in bedford, massachusetts. my mom is an amazing woman who sacrificed a great deal for her children. but i know i'm here also because a lot of people were -- expand opportunity. it's hard a little bit to share my story. but i know we live in cynic
to immigration reform and whatnot. this is of education, an issue. showing an issue about whether the results actually really matter and what the research actually really matters, or whether the congress lives in an evidence-free zone. pre-k actually works to help level the playing field. the president has put a bill out there. the house of representatives actually have a bipartisan bill, that lies in the house of representatives and the senate, the miller-harkin bill that has two republicans from new york state. i give them huge props for being part of it, hannah and grim. sailpre-k bill should through. if people want to make a smart investment, that should sail through but for the ideology of what the federal government should be spending. this,at is sad about states like oklahoma, you know, have shown us that pre-k really works. so we are fighting for it. i don't really know what its prospects are. i don't feel as hopeful as i wish -- you know, as the evidence should dictate. but we are fighting, fighting, fighting for that pre-k bill. number two, i think we could see a bill about career t
. a suburb of boston, the child of two immigrants from india. inlived in a house bedford, massachusetts, a middle-class town. when i was five, my parents got divorced and my dad left. my mother was on her own and never held a job before. she faced going back to india are going on welfare to support her two children. , we would've been stigmatized. it was unheard of to get divorced back then. she knew our life opportunities to be limited. she made that tough choice. she states. we stayed. we were on welfare. on food stamps. we received housing vouchers to pay for rent. but because of a series of fortuitous events, we were able to remain in bedford thomas and i was able to go to school. a job as atually got travel agent. by the time i was 11, i am proud to say that she bought her own house in bedford, massachusetts. my mom is an amazing woman who sacrificed a great deal for her children. i know i'm here also because a lot of people worked hard to expand opportunity. it's hard to share my story, but i know that we live in cynical times. it is easy to dismiss the fights in washington is par
look at age of individuals and may be involved in immigration and deportation issues. that phenotype is interesting and we are here today for forensics. this is a new little category on this chart. i've been using this lovely chart to teach for years and years and forensics has been added to the chart. in part it has been due in part to the popular culture, obviously loans and all the crime shows that have been on television but also current if ants and hearing about mass graves and the analysis of these remains that are coming from mass conflict have started to make their way into the public reception of the kind of work we do behind the scenes. so what is forensic anthropology you probably get a different definition from all forensic anthropologist because they haven't quite decided on what they are yet. it's a new subdisciplines within physical anthropology and they are trying to carve out a niche for themselves. folks that specialized in just dealing with medical and legal issues in contemporary events. so the folks at jpac and so are individuals that are worked in hawaii on the
to need immigration reform that grows the economy and takes people out of the shadows. we're going to need targeted initiatives to close those gaps. [applause] but here's an important point. the decades-long shifts in the economy have hurt all groups -- poor and middle class, inner city and rural folks, men and women, and americans of all races. and as a consequence, some of the social patterns that contribute to declining mobility that were once attributed to the urban poor -- that's a particular problem for the inner city -- single-parent households or drug abuse -- it turns out now we're seeing that pop up everywhere. a new study shows that disparities in education, mental health, obesity, absent fathers, isolation from church, isolation from community groups -- these gaps are now as much about growing up rich or poor as they are about anything else. the gap in test scores between poor kids and wealthy kids is now nearly twice what it is between white kids and black kids. kids with working-class parents are 10 times likelier than kids with middle- or upper-class parents to go through a
to allow immigration to our country with people have capital. right now we're losing people. people going to canada because income tax is 15%. expedite these visas for people who have $50,000. detroit doesn't need a handout. look at the proud history of detroit. we were the industrial giant of the world, detroit was the greatness of america. government didn't do this. you did this. government didn't discover, create, motown greats like smokey robinson or diana ross. we need to look at ourselves. we need to look in the mirror and we need to allow ourselves the freedom to create and innovate. you have leaders. think of dan gilbert of quick and loans they are pouring their hearts and souls and money into detroit. quick and loans have spent more than a billion dollars in detroit and moved 3600 employees into the city, creating thousands of jobs. quick and loans and center companies have 12,000 employees working in detroit. quick and loans is proving all the nay sayers wrong. go to quick and loans and you'll get a glimpse of detroit's future. detroit situation is a result of a corrupt marriage
. not immigrated, am repatriated. there is a difference. understand, why after 20 we are still in deadlock. i completely agree with many of , that i had had very bad guys. we had very good dollars -- guys who believe this was possible. we had the prime minister in netanyahu, and even in the white plantation. but despite all of these efforts, and of course all of the efforts of the american side, we are in deadlock. without understanding why are we are in deadlock, it is pop -- impossible to move ahead. there is a mistake that i think that i see. even not from security, and not fromour refugees, but people who think that do not trust about confidence, and credibility. today the trust between the two sides is about zero. it is impossible to create peace if you do not have any credibility. the mistake from all our -- upences in the past until today we only signed the treaties with the government and the rulers, not with the states, not with the people. it was our agreement with the rulers. i think that we must achieve solutions --nds of comprehensive solutions. >> let me ask you about one part o
income neighborhoods or may potentially think about immigrant communities as well. how do you create services, create those services and then promote and communicate those services and a way that's linguistically and culturally relevant to these committees as well. >> one of the issues you been working on at national to get cities is the issue best races which is how the business licensing regulations get in the way and how do they constrain microenterprises? you been doing with the issue of food trucks. and you talk about the work you've been doing and maybe give us ideas of places, of cities where there's a lot of interesting work going on and you're making progress and maybe what some of the challenges have been? >> sure. i think you raise a lot of interesting points and i would agree with most of those. when we think about licensing, particularly at the city levels and permits, there's always a reason why a particular permit or license was there to begin with but over time as we said, unless you actually taken in the door, take stock, think about why those licenses and permits ar
immigration, integration of highly skilled individuals, corporate tax reform come overseas profits, international trade and simplifying the streamlined regulation for improving the communication and the infrastructure and the sustainable budget and responsible development of american gas and oil reserves as important component of competitiveness worldwide. first i wanted to ask a little bit about do you think that it's possible to develop these reserves responsibly, is that the epa position? >> i believe so. >> tell me a little bit about what you think the approach should be and i want to give you time because i don't feel like -- you get interrupted sometimes when you try to get these answers. what should be the approach to the development of this i would ask you to touch on two things in particular. one is obviously water and supply and quality that the emission of gas including methane which is a super public and and also how you would avoid the double regulation because i understand there's other agencies in the government who may be doing things that are overlapping. >> there'
constitutional design. from obamacare to immigration, the current administration is picking and choosing which laws to an oars. the constitution does not confer upon the president the executive authority to disregard the separations of powers by unilaterally waving, suspending or revising the laws. it is a bedrock principle of constitutional law that the program must be fully execute acts of congress. the president cannot refuse to enforce the law simply because he dislikes it. certainly, president have from time to time make broad claims of executive power. however, assertions of executive authority have been limited to the area in which presidential powers are at their strongest. foreign affairs. the obama administration go has been equally assertive in the realm of domestic policy, routinely making end runs around congress for broad claims of prosecutorial discretion and regulatory actions that bush executive power beyond all limits. indeed, president obama is the first president since richard nixon to ignore a duly enacted law, simply because he disagrees with it. and they said the checks
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